Trust Your Instruments

Lesson Learned: Calibrate, monitor, and trust your instruments to keep on track.

I love to hear and tell stories in illustrating lessons learned. They really convey the emotional impact of the lesson at the time is was learned. This is a tale of two opposing true stories related to small craft navigation that actually happened to me. They take place a few years apart but have a number if similarities that make the point of the lesson learned.

Foggy Fail

In the summer of 1996 I was invited to on an night-time striper fishing trip inside the mouth of the Merrimack River. The skipper was the bother of a colleague, and he had a few friends and relatives on the trip. This was a beautiful 36′ twin-screw motor yacht that was only a year old. It was a very calm serene evening trip destined to anchor in the area inside the Ben Butler’s Toothpick rocks opposite Joppa Flats in Newburyport, MA. We dropped anchor in a two-point moor to keep our position fixed. I don’t recall what we were using as bait that night, but I know it was not artificial lures. We fished well into the night with little success, and no keepers, but it was a fun night. Shortly after midnight the fog rolled in quickly from the sea, engulfing the boat. It was a weeknight, getting late, and a bit cooler. So, we pulled up anchor and attempted to head back up river to the slip.

marine-radar-scopeThis boat was equipped with radar and could see the outline of the mainland mass and other larger objects, but couldn’t see the sandbars or markers on the radar, and we couldn’t see the shore. The tide was low and going lower, but could see and sense the flow of the river. The skipper pulled up anchor and started heading upriver. We could now see the first marker and it looked like we were heading in the right direction. A little further and we saw some other boats anchored that we had to move around. And then the boat touched a sandbar. The skipper motored over that one and back into the channel. We thought things were going well, but the appearance of the channel didn’t match the radar. The skipper started to correct to get back on track with the radar, but had to motor over another sandbar. This didn’t make sense. We should be on track and in the main channel, but as we moved forward we keep getting off course. The skipper debated backtracking downriver to get the channel and radar back in sync before going upriver further, but decided his instinct was better than the instruments. Big mistake. As it turns out we were getting further up a tidal channel in Joppa Flats with the tide going out and ran hard aground on the sand flats. We hit hard and you just know there was damage to the underside. The skipper radioed for the tow boat to come help. It was an off-hour call so it would take time for them to get there. Before we know it the boat listed to the side and we were high and dry on the sand. The tow boat could not help except to taxi the guests back to the dock. The skipper had to wait until dawn for the fog to lift and the tide to come back in and float him of. It cost the skipper several thousands of dollars that night in repairs and the tow back to the dock.

Foggy Success

In the summer of 2002 I took my Dad out for a ride in my new 21′ cuddy cabin I/O boat to the Isles of Shoals island of Portsmouth NH. It was a calm Saturday morning early in the season when the water was still a bit cold. I set the Isle of Shoals weigh-point in my dash-mounted GPS and we headed down river. It was nice and sunny, and we were up on a nice plane at 22 knots. We left the mouth of the Merrimack and veered off towards the Isle of Shoals. About 10 minutes into the ride we noticed what looked like fog on the horizon. It was moving towards us at a faster rate than I thought and I could feel a westerly breeze picking up. As the fog approached I noticed my Dad looking around my dashboard curiously. My Dad is an old-school electrical engineer, who was a master at the slide rule, map calipers and parallels, and calibrating an oil-filled compass. So I had to ask him what he was looking for. He ask where my compass is. I pointed down to my foot locker and said it was in there. He looked up at me shocked as the fog began to engulf us and asked how the hell are we going to navigate now? I dropped off the plane to about 8 knots and continued on track.

p_6875_garmin-gps128I pointed to the GPS on the dashboard and said I’m navigating from GPS. It tells me direction, constantly correcting for the westerly breeze nudging us to port. I told him I know how fast we are going, where the nun buoy at the entrance to the harbor is that we are targeting, and how long it is going to take us as this rate. He said oh, and what if that fails? I pulled out my backup waterproof handheld GPS in my pocket with fresh batteries and said “then we use this.” He looked at me with guarded approval and said “ok, if you say so.” Clearly my Dad had not used GPS for navigation before. At this point we had about 50′ of visibility. As we approached the targeted buoy, I slowed right down to a idle and said look off the bow, we should see the buoy in a few seconds. The red nun then popped out of the fog. And my Dad said “son of a gun, it worked!” My Dad and I used very different tools to navigate in nautical waters, but we each trusted our instruments and were able to keep on track with where we are going and when we will get there, even when we can’t visually see the target along the way.

Wisdom

Both these stories are memorable. The both share the lesson that you need to have good instruments, that give you the visibility you need to keep on track, and that you trust the instruments to guide you when you can’t see the target.

The same can be applied to the SaaS industry. We have many ways to measure and calibrate our instruments for applications, their containers and infrastructure and their tests. We must choose our measurement tools wisely, and calibrate, monitor, and trust your instruments to keep on track.

sonar2

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